walking the dog

Trondheim, 5.11.2015 – Polaroid Land Camera 250 / Fuji FP-3000b


“Time flies over us, but leaves its shadow behind” (Nathaniel Hawthorne)

First thing I saw

Polaroid shot. Taken straight upwards through the loft window right above my bed.

Berlin, part 2 (Polaroid sx-70)

Berlin does have color. However, Impossible Project’s color film for Polaroid cameras is ridiculously expensive, so be satisfied with the following.

Berlin, part 1 (Diana)

Tourist in Berlin for 3 days. This city turns out to be much less gray than I thought, however nothing is impossible for a Diana F+. So let there be grit and grain..

(In the next post I’ll let my Polaroid Sx-70 do more justice to the city’s colors).

Surprise! (polaroid)

Sun shines even on the coast of Norway, sometimes. Very last chances of some decent weather, these days, before an endless winter takes over. That’s why I’ll surprise you using color film, for once.

Double exposure made on Paranoid Land Camera 250 & Fuji FP-100c.


Man in a bar (Polaroid)

Wheel (pinhole)

My photo cave: Il cimento goes gallery

Starting from today, “il cimento” is also photo gallery, workshop, darkroom and meeting place for a photography chat. In other words, my photo cave.

Anyone who happens to be in Trondheim, Norway, is welcome to drop in. Impossible to miss, in the heart of Bakklandet.

You don’t want to buy any photos? Here’s what else you can do at my “photo cave” and how it works:

  • Check out inspiring photo books of my favourite photographers: Petersen, Sobol, Ackerman, d’Agata, Moriyama, Araki, etc. But mind: these are not for sale!
  • Try other types of film than what you normally use. Just bring a roll of negative film, color or BW, 35 mm or 120, and choose one of mine for free (I don’t sell film).
  • Borrow and try one of my old cameras: how about an old analogic SLR, an original Polaroid, a pinhole or a box camera? Swap whatever camera you can live without for a few days with whatever is available here and try new charming tools (I don’t sell cameras either).
  • Rent the whole gallery space to exhibit your own work for a week or two. Rather cheap too.

No matter what you want to do, you’re welcome. Right now I’m displaying about 50 of my pinhole photographs.

Il cimento gallery is located in Øvre Bakklandet 17, Trondheim, Norway.


Italian flag


Vernazza (pinhole)

more chocolates

A few more chocolates from the 1955 box (camera).

Box of chocolate from 1955

A box camera is like a box of chocolate.. you never know what you’re gonna get. Specially when you take multiple exposures.

Kiss on the bridge (pinhole)

Trondheim, Norway.

The road. Unclear.

sea hawk

At the edge


Godøya, Norway (Pinhole).




Ice walkers

Diana’s thoughts

Winter – II. Largo

My mother

My mother on her daily afternoon-nap.

Gothic Oslo

Psychiatric Centre at dawn

Me and Holga at Østmarka psychiatric centre, Trondheim.

Diana F.

Meet the beautiful Diana F.

Double exposure

Almost home

Near Ferrara, Italy. January 2015.

Card players

Shattered sky

Tokyo (pinhole)

Tokyo, November 2014. Sharan pinhole camera, modified.

My-day, my-day

Oslo. Going to work today, but not feeling like..

Keio Plaza, Tokyo

Diana, Diana..

Only you see the world as I see it..

Dreaming of an escape

Misaki Koh (pinhole)

Misaki Koh, Tokyo (Japan). November 2014.


Holga, Holga…


Pinhole N.Y.

New York, last week.

Industrial nonsense (pinhole)

Oslo fjord (pinhole)

Home sweet home



COWS (pinhole)

Dolomites, Italy. July 2014.


Lunch on carpets, and Tri-X. Badakhshan, Afghanistan. May 2014.

Salaam, Afghanistan

17th May 2014. While Norway celebrates the 200 year anniversary of their constitution, I’m heading for the remote Badakhshan, north east of Afghanistan, for the third time.

There, no constitutional paper grants each and every citizen equal rights, as a base for justice and prosperity. There, natural hazards alone cost hundreds of lives every year. Just 10 days ago, a massive landslide buried half a village and between 2000 and 2700 people, over a third of whom children. A few thousand more have been forced to leave their houses of clay, maybe forever. The disaster in Badakhshan made international headlines for 2 – 3 days and now is gone, forgotten.


For images and stories from my previous trips to Afghanistan, see the Documentary section above.


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