Boundary line

There is a boundary line between what a photographer feels should be documented and shown and what should remain private. The few photos below are from a project I just did about that boundary line, which in this case happened to coincide with the boundary between life and death. And these are the only few photos from that project that will ever be displayed…

Forest of thoughts (pinhole)

Unclear tangle of plants, and thoughts. Kodak Tri-X and modified Sharan pinhole camera, as usual.

By the fjord (pinhole)

February 2014, Trondheim’s fjord, central Norway (probably the first snow free winter in Norwegian history). Kodak Tri-X in modified Sharan pinhole camera.

Johnnie stalker

Sharan pinhole camera, Kodak Tri-X.

31.12.13

Trondheim 31.12.13. Tri-X.

Friends on new year’s eve

Kodak Tri-X in Rodinal 1:50. Shaken, not stirred.

Milan, pinhole

Milan, Italy, 19.12.2013. Modified Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

Emilia, Italy (pinhole)

Countryside near Ferrara, Italy, 18.12.2013. Sharan pinhole camera, Tri-X 400.

Trans-Siberian IV: Encounters

Fellow passengers, strangers met in the street, encounters that lasted minutes, hours, few days at the most. Regardless, encounters that made my day and my journey. Here are some of them.

Trans-Siberian III: Train of thoughts

Since I was a child, I’ve always had a tremendous fascination for trains and stations. We used to travel between the south and the north of Italy a couple of times a year, usually on a night train that would take almost 12 hours. Each and every evening during the weeks prior to our travels, my brother and I spent hours fantasizing about the…

Trans-Siberian II: Slow motion

9289 km on a train are and definitely feel like a huge distance. Landscapes pass by like in slow motion. Repetitive and monotonous yet ever changing. Days become nights, and the nights days.

Trans-Siberian I: pinhole

First post of a coming series from my Trans-Siberian journey. This with a few pinhole shots. Why I do this? It’s the closest I get to producing suggestive images from nothing. If I could draw, I’d use charcoal. But I can’t, so I use Tri-X.

Røros (pinhole)

Røros. Norway, 30.11.2013. Home made pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X (1 – 4 sec exposures, handheld camera).

See you

The geese and I share an inextinguishable, almost compulsory need to cover great distances, never settling down completely, commuting between opposite corners of the world. These days they’re flying southwards. In 36 hours, I’ll be heading eastwards, leaving for THE train journey. See you.

Fog (pinhole)

Norway, September 2013. Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

“Image saving error”

No pixels, no SD cards, no batteries, no auto-focus lenses, no manual focus lenses. No lenses and no focusing at all. The camera: a cardboard box. The “lens”: a 0.16mm pinhole on the front of the box. The shutter: a removable piece of cardboard covering the pinhole. And off you go: pinhole photography, where each exposure needs seconds in bright light, minutes in low…

Pinhole roll n.I – Trondheim

First roll of Tri-X 400 exposed through a paper-made pinhole camera bought in Tokyo. All images were shot handheld, in some cases holding the camera against walls or so. Exposure times of 1 – 5 seconds.

“The Japan book” – now for sale

Now you have the opportunity to buy a paper copy (or an iBook versjon for tablets) of my book “The Japan book”, featuring all photos from my post “The Tokyo post” and many more. You can scroll through, preview and purchase the book for a modest price at: http://www.blurb.com/b/4477107-the-japan-book Enjoy it!

The Tokyo post

My notes from a recent trip to Tokyo and Kyoto. Written on Kodak Tri-X. (open the post for full-sized slideshow)

The blue of Afghanistan

A number of you, after seeing my previous series from Afghanistan, noticed (and commented on) the absence of women. Well, with this post I focus exactly on the women of Afghanistan. Unfortunately, photographing women there is rather problematic. Just about everyone will strongly advise you against doing so: Photographing a woman (even one in a chador) out in the street may result in you…

Fayzabad, Afghanistan (Tri-X 400)

Fayzabad, north-eastern province of Badakhshan, in president Karzai’s Afghanistan. While men proudly walk the streets and pose for photographs, women hide behind their chador or stay confined to dedicated areas (like the women recreational park that I had the unique privilege to be admitted to). More of my BW work in Afghanistan here: Streets and roads of Afghanistan

The window

Murmansk, Russia, 17th March 2013. View from the staircase to my flat.

Harald

This is the short story of my encounter with Harald. It would never have happened if it wasn’t for the girl you see in this picture. She didn’t drop a coin by Harald’s feet, but stopped and gave him a few minutes of her time and attention. Only seconds before, I had passed by him giving him nothing but a smile. Seeing this girl…

Kirovsk – Apatity

Another couple of hours by train and I’m in Apatity, named after the phosphate mineral the hills around the city are rich of. Needless to say, that’s the very reason why a city was founded here, back in 1935.  It’s a bit strange for an Italian to think that all these towns are only 50 – 80 years old (my parent’s house is way…

Olenegorsk

Olenegorsk. Gray weather, 10 degrees Celsius. My first thought as I looked through the curtains of my hotel window: “oh gosh, what am I going to do here for two days alone?”. So I went out with my cameras and a short while later it was time to leave. Funny how time flies sometimes, when you meet people who aren’t afraid to smile to…

Back to Russia

I just came back from yet another fantastic journey through a remote region of Russia. Remote because it lies almost 2 days by train from Moscow or St. Petersburg, but in fact it’s pretty much around the corner if you enter it from northern Scandinavia. Yet, the landscapes and especially the cultural landscapes that meet you as you travel the Kola region of Russia…

Streets and roads of Afghanistan

What defines street photography? And what defines a street? Asphalt? Shiny skyscrapers? Street lights? Busy people rushing in or out of a subway? In this case, doing street photography in Afghanistan (and much of the world) might be hard, as you find none of that. Whether they qualify as street photography or not, the pictures below are all taken on the streets and roads…

The bill

This post, the last one before my trip to Afghanistan, is about being old and alone, about loneliness. You figure out a story behind this shot.

No more trains

Very different human stories, the same destiny: a subway station. Not as a short, noisy interlude between home and work or between family life and friends, but itself home, family, friend and only daily occupation. Some of these people just kept missing the train of their life, the train that could have taken them to a regular office job or to the joys of…

Invisible border

A couple of centimeters of glass can keep two worlds completely apart. It happens in prisons. It happens in the streets. I took this picture in a busy shopping street of Quartier Latin in Paris, in 2005. On the one side of the window of a fashion store, while their parents do some shopping, two children look at the unaware homeless man sitting just…

Dummies

I’ve always been searching for new ways to make my life meaningful, to fill it with something worthy. And I’ve always felt little and insignificant comparing myself with those I admire, famous or completely unknown people who really make the difference for others as well as filling their own lives with things worth living for. I believe that having a brain and a normally…

Turid

I was taking street photos, when I came across a nursing home that I didn’t even know was there. Just outside it, on a wheel chair, an elegant old lady seems to be enjoying some fresh air as she whaves me hallo. Then she tells me to be careful not to slip on the ice, how nice of her! I stop to exchange a…

The perfect machine

Few things fit to the definition of “the perfect machine” better than an orchestra. To agree on this, you just need to commit yourself to learning an instrument. It will take you many years of devotion (and frustration) and most likely you’ll never get close to the skills it takes to perform in a real orchestra. Some years ago I was asked to take…

Cruising at 80°N

I just rediscovered a series of negatives I shot a few years ago, while on a photo assignment onboard the research vessel “Lance” around Spitzbergen. Thought of sharing a few of them..