Fog (pinhole)

Norway, September 2013. Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

Grave visit (pinhole)

Lom, Norway. Tri-X 400.

“Image saving error”

No pixels, no SD cards, no batteries, no auto-focus lenses, no manual focus lenses. No lenses and no focusing at all.

The camera: a cardboard box. The “lens”: a 0.16mm pinhole on the front of the box. The shutter: a removable piece of cardboard covering the pinhole. And off you go: pinhole photography, where each exposure needs seconds in bright light, minutes in low light. A pain in the ass, you may say.

The truth is there is little as rewarding as creating a photo literally from scratch, from building your camera, to judging your exposure times, to developing your film.

In pinhole photography, it’s just the technique’s weaknesses and even your mistakes that result in rewarding and fascinating images. This is a double exposure I got at the end of the last roll: film couldn’t advance enough for a regular new exposure and the very last one partly overlapped the previous. An image saving error, if you will.

Sofia’s love for pigeons

Bologna, Italy. T-Max 400 developed in Rodinal. Scanned, uncropped.

Mourn

Young owls. Kodak TMax 100.

The Tokyo post

My notes from a recent trip to Tokyo and Kyoto. Written on Kodak Tri-X.

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A penny for your thoughts

Girl in a coffee shop, Kyoto, June 2013. Kodak Tri-X 400.

Dogs and owners..

Did anyone say that dogs and their owners often look alike? Anyway, Kodak TMax 400, just scanned.

Another stroll in Venice

A few “street” shots I got the last couple of days in Venice (where there are formally speaking no streets). I wasn’t there to take photos, but had a few hours for myself tried to get something out of them.

No awesome postcards, sorry. Having been in Venice over a hundred times I just can’t.

You may also want to see these others shot from a trip in Venice a year ago: Adagio, Allegro, Venezia

The bill

This post, the last one before my trip to Afghanistan, is about being old and alone, about loneliness.

You figure out a story behind this shot.

No more trains

Very different human stories, the same destiny: a subway station. Not as a short, noisy interlude between home and work or between family life and friends, but itself home, family, friend and only daily occupation.

Some of these people just kept missing the train of their life, the train that could have taken them to a regular office job or to the joys of a happy family. Some others jumped on many trains but were thrown off each and every one of them, humiliated like ticketless passengers.

Invisible border

A couple of centimeters of glass can keep two worlds completely apart. It happens in prisons. It happens in the streets. I took this picture in a busy shopping street of Quartier Latin in Paris, in 2005. On the one side of the window of a fashion store, while their parents do some shopping, two children look at the unaware homeless man sitting just on the other side of the window.

A thin glass plate is the invisible border between young and old, rich and poor, symbolically separating innocent childhood and adult life at its hardest.

(Image awarded the 1st price in the category “snapshot of the month” by National Geographic and published on issue 8/2012 for the Scandinavian countries)

Image

Adagio, Allegro, Venezia

What strikes you most when visiting in Venice? Magnificent palaces, timeless atmospheres? No, people, lots of people. Visitors from all over the world crowd Venice at any time of the year, bringing money to some and stress to the rest of the city’s residents. Yet even back in its gold days, “la Serenissima” used to be crowded, the number of its inhabitants at that time being triple than today’s. But things change when the night or the rain comes.

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