Almost home

Near Ferrara, Italy. January 2015.

Card players

Shattered sky

Tokyo (pinhole)

Tokyo, November 2014. Sharan pinhole camera, modified.

My-day, my-day

Oslo. Going to work today, but not feeling like..

Keio Plaza, Tokyo

Diana, Diana..

Only you see the world as I see it..

….

Pinhole N.Y.

New York, last week.

Industrial nonsense (pinhole)

Boundary line

There is a boundary line between what a photographer feels should be documented and shown and what should remain private.

The few photos below are from a project I just did about that boundary line, which in this case happened to coincide with the boundary between life and death.

And these are the only few photos from that project that will ever be displayed on this blog. The other photos need to mature. They may never see the light or may one day be shown in a more appropriate way than on a blog.

If you want to share a thought on where your boundary line goes, as a photographer, or about these shots I shared, please feel free to comment.

“O”

War

Street art, Oslo, 30.10.2013

Mourn

Young owls. Kodak TMax 100.

A penny for your thoughts

Girl in a coffee shop, Kyoto, June 2013. Kodak Tri-X 400.

The perfect machine

Few things fit to the definition of “the perfect machine” better than an orchestra. To agree on this, you just need to commit yourself to learning an instrument. It will take you many years of devotion (and frustration) and most likely you’ll never get close to the skills it takes to perform in a real orchestra.

Some years ago I was asked to take a few photos of the Tromsø Chamber Orchestra during a rehearsal. Here are some shots.

Am I a criminal?

Two days ago, once again in Oslo, I got slightly in trouble with a hotel receptionist for taking one of the photos in the series below. She meant I was not allowed to photograph the hotel window from the public street. I protested that even though it was a private property, it’s perfectly visible from the public street and there’s no sign forbidding photography.

After I got back to my hotel, I did some research to find out what the Norwegian law says about street photography. Am I only doing this now after 10 years of street photography? Yes in fact.

What I found out is that the Norwegian law is very strict in protecting personal rights. It’s perfectly legal to photograph anyone (maybe except children) without asking for a permission, but it’s not allowed to publish photographs of identifiable persons without their permission. Exceptions are photos where the identifiable persons are taking part in street protests, parades or similar, photos that have a public usefulness (whatever that is), and photos the main content of which isn’t the person – although identifiable – but the situation, the context this person is involved in. Hopefully, most of my pictures will fall within this last category for the judge who gets my case the day someone sues me for doing street photography and sharing it. The alternative is photos like the ones below, without a face or a soul. Feel free to leave a thought on this, if you like.

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