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Wheel (pinhole)

RUINS

Italian flag

Shade

Vernazza (pinhole)

The road. Unclear.

At the edge

Godøya

Godøya, Norway (Pinhole).

Sea

Totem

Ice walkers

Diana’s thoughts

Almost home

Near Ferrara, Italy. January 2015.

Tokyo (pinhole)

Tokyo, November 2014. Sharan pinhole camera, modified.

Diana, Diana..

Only you see the world as I see it..

Misaki Koh (pinhole)

Misaki Koh, Tokyo (Japan). November 2014.

 

Pinhole N.Y.

New York, last week.

Industrial nonsense (pinhole)

Oslo fjord (pinhole)

Home sweet home

Alone

Pinhole.

COWS (pinhole)

Dolomites, Italy. July 2014.

Forest of thoughts (pinhole)

Unclear tangle of plants, and thoughts. Kodak Tri-X and modified Sharan pinhole camera, as usual.

By the fjord (pinhole)

February 2014, Trondheim’s fjord, central Norway (probably the first snow free winter in Norwegian history). Kodak Tri-X in modified Sharan pinhole camera.

Johnnie stalker

Sharan pinhole camera, Kodak Tri-X.

jan14046-5-2

House (pinhole)

A pigeon’s point of view (pinhole)

Irkutsk, Siberia, November 2013. Sharan pinhole camera & Tri-X.

Milan, pinhole

Milan, Italy, 19.12.2013. Modified Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

Emilia, Italy (pinhole)

Countryside near Ferrara, Italy, 18.12.2013. Sharan pinhole camera, Tri-X 400.

Trans-Siberian I: pinhole

First post of a coming series from my Trans-Siberian journey. This with a few pinhole shots.

Why I do this? It’s the closest I get to producing suggestive images from nothing. If I could draw, I’d use charcoal. But I can’t, so I use Tri-X.

Røros (pinhole)

Røros. Norway, 30.11.2013. Home made pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X (1 – 4 sec exposures, handheld camera).

Fog (pinhole)

Norway, September 2013. Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

Grave visit (pinhole)

Lom, Norway. Tri-X 400.

“Image saving error”

No pixels, no SD cards, no batteries, no auto-focus lenses, no manual focus lenses. No lenses and no focusing at all.

The camera: a cardboard box. The “lens”: a 0.16mm pinhole on the front of the box. The shutter: a removable piece of cardboard covering the pinhole. And off you go: pinhole photography, where each exposure needs seconds in bright light, minutes in low light. A pain in the ass, you may say.

The truth is there is little as rewarding as creating a photo literally from scratch, from building your camera, to judging your exposure times, to developing your film.

In pinhole photography, it’s just the technique’s weaknesses and even your mistakes that result in rewarding and fascinating images. This is a double exposure I got at the end of the last roll: film couldn’t advance enough for a regular new exposure and the very last one partly overlapped the previous. An image saving error, if you will.

Pinhole roll n.I – Trondheim

First roll of Tri-X 400 exposed through a paper-made pinhole camera bought in Tokyo.

All images were shot handheld, in some cases holding the camera against walls or so. Exposure times of 1 – 5 seconds.

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