Poland

Just back from a train trip to Poland and Ukraine. Souvenir time. Poland first.

Lunch

Lunch on carpets, and Tri-X. Badakhshan, Afghanistan. May 2014.

Forest of thoughts (pinhole)

Unclear tangle of plants, and thoughts. Kodak Tri-X and modified Sharan pinhole camera, as usual.

By the fjord (pinhole)

February 2014, Trondheim’s fjord, central Norway (probably the first snow free winter in Norwegian history). Kodak Tri-X in modified Sharan pinhole camera.

House (pinhole)

A pigeon’s point of view (pinhole)

Irkutsk, Siberia, November 2013. Sharan pinhole camera & Tri-X.

31.12.13

Trondheim 31.12.13. Tri-X.

Friends on new year’s eve

Kodak Tri-X in Rodinal 1:50. Shaken, not stirred.

Milan, pinhole

Milan, Italy, 19.12.2013. Modified Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

Emilia, Italy (pinhole)

Countryside near Ferrara, Italy, 18.12.2013. Sharan pinhole camera, Tri-X 400.

Minimalism

Snow.

Trans-Siberian IV: Encounters

Fellow passengers, strangers met in the street, encounters that lasted minutes, hours, few days at the most. Regardless, encounters that made my day and my journey. Here are some of them.

Trans-Siberian III: Train of thoughts

Since I was a child, I’ve always had a tremendous fascination for trains and stations.

We used to travel between the south and the north of Italy a couple of times a year, usually on a night train that would take almost 12 hours. Each and every evening during the weeks prior to our travels, my brother and I spent hours fantasizing about the coming adventure. We could recall details of each station from our previous travels. The lights, the signs, the technical stuff along the tracks, everything had a mysterious charm. When the night of our train adventure came, we couldn’t sleep a minute. Instead, we stood in the aisle and admired the night passing by and becoming a new day. Even the thought of the typical smell of the stations still gives me the goosebumps.

I guess that has something to do with my love for trains. No train journey is too long. And the Trans-Siberian is surely worth repeating.

Trans-Siberian II: Slow motion

9289 km on a train are and definitely feel like a huge distance. Landscapes pass by like in slow motion. Repetitive and monotonous yet ever changing. Days become nights, and the nights days.

Trans-Siberian I: pinhole

First post of a coming series from my Trans-Siberian journey. This with a few pinhole shots.

Why I do this? It’s the closest I get to producing suggestive images from nothing. If I could draw, I’d use charcoal. But I can’t, so I use Tri-X.

Røros (pinhole)

Røros. Norway, 30.11.2013. Home made pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X (1 – 4 sec exposures, handheld camera).

Manicure

Copenhagen, 25.10.2013. Kodak Tri-X.

Fog (pinhole)

Norway, September 2013. Sharan pinhole camera & Kodak Tri-X.

Grave visit (pinhole)

Lom, Norway. Tri-X 400.

“Image saving error”

No pixels, no SD cards, no batteries, no auto-focus lenses, no manual focus lenses. No lenses and no focusing at all.

The camera: a cardboard box. The “lens”: a 0.16mm pinhole on the front of the box. The shutter: a removable piece of cardboard covering the pinhole. And off you go: pinhole photography, where each exposure needs seconds in bright light, minutes in low light. A pain in the ass, you may say.

The truth is there is little as rewarding as creating a photo literally from scratch, from building your camera, to judging your exposure times, to developing your film.

In pinhole photography, it’s just the technique’s weaknesses and even your mistakes that result in rewarding and fascinating images. This is a double exposure I got at the end of the last roll: film couldn’t advance enough for a regular new exposure and the very last one partly overlapped the previous. An image saving error, if you will.

Pinhole roll n.I – Trondheim

First roll of Tri-X 400 exposed through a paper-made pinhole camera bought in Tokyo.

All images were shot handheld, in some cases holding the camera against walls or so. Exposure times of 1 – 5 seconds.

The Tokyo post

My notes from a recent trip to Tokyo and Kyoto. Written on Kodak Tri-X.

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A penny for your thoughts

Girl in a coffee shop, Kyoto, June 2013. Kodak Tri-X 400.

Fayzabad, Afghanistan (Tri-X 400)

Fayzabad, north-eastern province of Badakhshan, in president Karzai’s Afghanistan.

While men proudly walk the streets and pose for photographs, women hide behind their chador or stay confined to dedicated areas (like the women recreational park that I had the unique privilege to be admitted to).

More of my BW work in Afghanistan here: Streets and roads of Afghanistan

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